In the back of the Print Shop L.A., there’s a large, clunky machine, its beige and off-white exterior mottled with splotches of colored ink. If it looks like a relic from a 20th century office, that’s because it is. These days, though, the machine—known as a Risograph—is a tool for making art. “It’s really a screen-printing machine if you look at it because it makes a stencil inside and each color is printed individually so you have to feed the sheets through for each color and put an actual drum of soy ink inside the machine,” explains Michelle Miller, one of the four artists who runs the Chinatown print-making studio. “It’s a really fun, retro-feeling process.” “They were originally used as a cheap alternative to color copies in schools,” adds artist and co-founder Jayes Caitlin. In recent years, the antiquated technology gained a second life among artists who could use it in ways similar to screen printing. The Print Shop L.A. is one of very few places that has the machine, and it’s become a popular feature at the studio. When the shop hosts Risograph workshops, the sessions fill up fast. “I think a lot of people who have heard of Risograph and have never had an opportunity t...