Palo Alto and the Bay Area are at great risk for a large fire similar to the Camp Fire in Butte County, a California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) spokesman said. The Bay Area is currently vulnerable to a possible fire that could spread into residential areas because of low humidity, dry vegetation and light winds, Cal Fire spokesman Jim Crawford said. “We’ve had some pretty extreme conditions in the last month. It’s never really changed,” he said, noting the sustained, offshore winds that bring drier air. The relative humidity in the Los Altos/Palo Alto mountainous areas has recently been as low as 16 percent and as high as 42 percent, depending on the time of day, according to National Weather Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data. But the historical November average humidity is about 68 percent. Even more concerning, the vegetation or “fuel” moisture in the past week was only 5-7 percent — exceedingly dry — according to NOAA. Local foothills and the Santa Cruz Mountains have a similar fuel load and topography as that near the town of Paradise. Hilly canyons there channelled winds and inc...