Editor’s note: This story originally ran in 2010 and has been updated. You can read the previous post here. As Americans, we can feel patriotic when considering tin ceilings. It’s one of the few decorative elements found in the Victorian Age that didn’t come from directly from England or another part of Europe. They originated in the good old U.S.A., but were inspired by European decor, and from the highest examples of such. By the mid-1800s, photography, books and actual travel had made the wonders of the tradition of fine plasterwork — as found in the manor houses, churches and government buildings of England and other parts of Europe — known to Americans, and they wanted it, especially the growing numbers of the up and coming middle class. But decorative plaster ceiling elements were heavy, difficult to ship, and hard to install, and therefore exceedingly expensive and impractical. So America turned to technology to solve the problem. Some smart person thought of stamping designs on sheets of thin, rolled out tin, and an important decorative industry was born. Thin sheets of rolled tin or steel were placed on a raised cast iron mold, called the die, and a heavy cast iron pla...